Trading Faces

NY Times summarized a study from  The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on company names, language and money:

A stock ticker symbol or company name that is easy to pronounce may be a significant factor in short-term increases in stock price, according to a report published online yesterday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Two researchers created a list of fictional stocks and then had a group of students rate them according to ease of pronunciation. “Ulymnius,” for example, was rated complex, while “Mayville” was not.

They then asked a second group to estimate the future performance of each of the stocks. As the researchers predicted, “fluently named” companies were estimated to outperform the hard-to-pronounce ones by a significant margin.

…People respond positively to easily processed information in other areas as well. For example, they are more likely to believe an aphorism that rhymes (”woes unite foes”) than one with an identical meaning that does not rhyme (”woes unite enemies”). Studies cited in the report demonstrate that people more often judge easily processed information to be true, likable, familiar and convincing than more complex data.

The Times fails to mention two other curious reports in Sunday’s PNAS, notably, “Polarized axonal surface expression of neuronal KCNQ channels is mediated by multiple signals in the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 C-terminal domains” and “A hybrid two-component system protein of a prominent human gut symbiont couples glycan sensing in vivo to carbohydrate metabolism”, which are basically concise summaries of the Interbrand and Landor naming processes, respectively.

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Landorian Logic

With the unrelenting consistency of a Borscht Belt comic, naming and branding parody site Landor continues to go for laughs with a well worn schtick:

We developed the name Centravis to communicate the brand’s positioning as “the best of both worlds” and a balance between East and West

They’ll be here all week. Try the eel!

BlandorSays Blandor the Imponderable: That’s nothing. I remember when Fannie Brice, Paul Whiteman, George Jessel, Sophie Tucker and I first got into the name trade. We were all playing a two week gig in the Sour Cream Sierras when Sophie turns to Fannie and says:

” The new name, Enactus, was initially inspired by the idea of compounding “Entrepreneurial Action,” but it was created to transcend those roots and encompass the strong emotion that the brand evokes. The name encapsulates the intricate balance between youthful energy and a sophisticated stature that defines the organization. Enactus works as a call to action—it is an invitation to students to put their skills and education into action, and it is an inspiration for the socially responsible leaders of today to help cultivate the socially responsible leaders of tomorrow.”

Everybody plotzed!


More of Blandor’s rants here.

How to sell fish pie

company name
Thanks to Tom Whitwell of The Times of London, who waved this one under our noses first thing in the morning. Tom e-mails:

If you’re going to have a brand name like Eat Fussy, you have to be very careful which fonts you use.

Lower case was probably a good call…

“Mummy’s Favourite”. We’re sold.

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Green is the new Yellow

company names

Actually it’s better than Yellow, naming-wise. Usually, we would advise against using the word “Green” as a modifier to a business name as a way of conveying “echo-friendly”. It’s done so much that Green noise becomes White noise. It’s hack naming, and only appropriate for hacks, hence Green Cab of San Francisco.

It’s the perfect name for a cab company comprised entirely of hybrid vehicles’, and it also leverages the until now untouchably iconic Yellow Cab brand against itself. Nice. And success is guaranteed by the fact that by simply calling Green Cab instead of Yellow, the customer feels like they have done something honorable.


(415) 626-GREEN

NAMING FIRMS

Crochet cachet

Of all the fetish magazines on the market, this one makes us feel the naughtiest. Crochet Fantasy, by virtue of its absurd name, has made the mundane oddly compelling. And disturbing. And sublimely subliminal.

Simultaneously squeaky clean AND tawdry. It’s so bad, it’s good. Perfect.

crochet

Or maybe it’s just our predilection for coarse, mustard-colored yarn…

Touché.

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b2b to b2c – Discussion topic

We trying a first here, trying to start an actual discussion. How novel.

Question: Can anyone think of any b2b brands that have tried and failed at becoming a b2c brand?

Add your two cents on this topic in the Comments.

Next week: Conversing with inanimate objects, aka designers.